HERITAGE BALL NEWS

VIDEOS: WHAT DO YOU LOVE ABOUT THE HERITAGE BALL?

Without our gracious sponsors, the Heritage Ball wouldn’t be possible — and that’d be a cryin’ shame! Watch to see which faces are supporting this year’s Ball… and what their favorite parts of the soiree are:

41st HERITAGE BALL NEXT SATURDAY, SEPT. 20 AT EASTERN FLANK
2014 Ball King & Queen Named, Menu and Band Details Announced

2014 Heritage Ball King and QueenWilliamson County’s longest-running black tie event is rapidly approaching, and officials from the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County are making final preparations for the nearly sold-out 41st Annual Heritage Ball on Saturday, Sept. 20 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin.

At last week’s Sponsors Party at the beautifully restored antebellum Jasmine Grove home of Lucibeth and Brian Mayberry, organizers surprised downtown Franklin residents Greg Flittner and Nancy Smith with a special honor: the pair was named King and Queen of the Ball, respectively.

“Greg and Nancy have been tireless supporters of the Heritage Foundation, having chaired events and volunteered in myriad ways,” said Torrey Barnhill, Heritage Ball coordinator. “Our Board, staff and Ball committee is proud to recognize them for all they’ve done to advance our mission of protecting and preserving the places that matter in Williamson County.”

Flittner, who now serves as president of the Downtown Neighborhood Association, spent 23 years in healthcare with General Electric and is currently vice president of development for CDI, with an office in Franklin’s downtown historic district. Nancy, who is president of the Brownstones Homeowners Association board of directors, has been heavily involved in assembling a record-setting silent auction offering for this year’s Heritage Ball.

“We feel like we owe it to the community to give our time and try to make it even better,” Smith said. “It has been our honor to be able to get involved with the Heritage Foundation and work with their tremendous staff. Being in a leadership role on the silent auction committee has allowed us to meet so many great people and make lasting friendships.”

The silent auction includes more than 150 items collectively representing approximately $100,000 in retail value. Items range from artwork to luxurious vacation packages, one-of-a-kind jewelry to tickets and rare experiences donated by supporters of the Heritage Foundation. For the first time ever, attendees will be able to bid online using their mobile devices during the event.

Another treat will be the menu, focusing on fresh, local delights from Chef’s Market including a fall salad with apples, Cajun seared pork belly and maple vinaigrette; a New York strip steak loin roulade with mushroom duxelle with spinach, smoked tomato and a Madiera demiglace; and a triple chocolate mousse teardrop cake with Chambord cream and fresh raspberries. Three local farmers – Delvin Farms, Noble Springs Dairy and Allenbrook Farms – have supplied product, and a vegetarian stuffed portabella mushroom option is also available.

Prior to dinner, during the cocktail hour, Williamson County’s Five Points Swing Band will serenade guests with the big band sounds of Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Duke Ellington and Frank Sinatra. Afterward, the dance floor will be packed as Band X from Atlanta keeps the crowd moving until late. Of course, there’s a local connection – Franklin’s own Michelle Froedge is a singer with the dance band that has developed a following all over the South.

Attendees can also enjoy a wine-tasting tent, sponsored by Lipman Brothers & R.S. Lipman, and late-night Southern bites compliments of Puckett’s Trolley.

“There are so many incredible components to this year’s event, including the nod to the 150thanniversary of the Battle of Franklin in 2014,” Barnhill said. “We’ve got some surprises in store, and we’re nearly sold out. We encourage anyone planning to attend to purchase tickets now, before it’s too late.”

To purchase tickets, contact Barnhill at (615) 591-8500 or by email attbarnhill@historicfranklin.com.

Since 1967, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

CHAIRS NAMED FOR 41ST ANNUAL HERITAGE BALL IN SEPTEMBER 2014 
Hincheyville Neighbors Represent Past, Present & Future of Black Tie Event

Breathards, web

Generations of Williamson County residents have made a tradition of supporting the Heritage Ball, the community’s longest-running black tie event. Now, Brian and Lisa Beathard of the Hincheyville neighborhood in downtown Franklin have been named Chairs of the Heritage Ball, and their neighbor Marty Ligon, who launched the initiative 41 years ago, will serve as Honorary Chair.

“Historic preservation is about honoring the past as part of our present and our future,” said Mary Pearce, executive director of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County. “This is a long-standing tradition and a principal fundraiser, so it’s exciting to see a young professional couple as Chairs who want to continue the Heritage Ball legacy that the ones who came before them brought to life.”

Brian Beathard currently serves as a County Commissioner in the 11th district. A sales executive in the transportation industry, he is a native Texan and a graduate of Baylor University. Since moving to Franklin with Lisa and their two children, Payce (9) and Ava (11), the Beathards have jumped headfirst into community service. Brian currently sits on the boards of the Heritage Foundation, Franklin Tomorrow, the Williamson County Education Foundation, the Downtown Neighborhood Association and Carnton Plantation. In addition, he serves on the County Budget Committee and the Parks and Recreation Committee, and is also a member of the Franklin Noon Rotary.

Born and raised in Nashville, Lisa Beathard is an alumnus of Brentwood Academy and Belmont University. A scholarship athlete at Belmont, she has been a Registered Nurse at St. Thomas Hospital for 18 years. She volunteers on a regular basis with Poplar Grove School, where the children attend, and has worked in support of various events for the Heritage Foundation, including the Town & Country Tour of Homes, the Main Street Brew Fest, Pumpkinfest and the Main Street Festival.

“Lisa and I fell in love with Franklin when we first met, and we knew we wanted to raise our family here and be involved with shaping the future of the community,” Brian said. “Now, almost 10 years later, we’re honored to be able to head a talented committee that orchestrates one of the most significant events of the year.”

Marty Ligon

Marty Ligon, who also lives in the Hincheyville Historic District, was the leader of a core group of people who conceived and executed the inaugural Heritage Ball 41 years ago. Back then, Carnton Plantation was home to tenant farmers, and had fallen into disrepair. During the frantic renovation in advance of the first Ball, bare wiring and other hazards were discovered, potentially heading off disaster for what has become one of the region’s most popular Civil War tourism destinations.

“Not only were we able to highlight the importance of Carnton and convince the families to allow us to borrow artifacts to decorate the house as it would have been before the Battle of Franklin, but things like Carrie McGavock’s portrait and the dining room table and many other key pieces remain in the home today,” Ligon said. “The Ball was the spark that set in motion a series of events that brings us to where we are now, which no one could have imagined back then.”

Ligon says it required a Herculean effort to pull off the inaugural event. People who were involved back then are some of the familiar faces you still see at the Heritage Ball today – people like Sandy Zeigler, Ann Herbert Floyd, Rod Heller, Danny and Teresa Anderson, and Joe and Betty Willoughby, who were named King and Queen of the Ball last year, and so many more.

“We were inspired by a cause that was important to us, and it’s a thrill to see how far everything has come today,” she said. “Sometimes people have trouble visualizing what something can be, and it’s always been a source of pride that we were able to accomplish our mission. I couldn’t be more delighted to serve as the Honorary Chair, and to share that recognition with everyone else who played a role.”

Since 1967, the not-for-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission has been to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation. To learn more, visit www.historicfranklin.com or contact Torrey Barnhill at tbarnhill@historicfranklin.com.

2013 Heritage Ball News

FOOD AND SERVICE AMONG CHERISHED TRADITIONS AT 40TH ANNUAL HERITAGE BALL

Hank Delvin and Dani Kates pick produce for Heritage Ball - small.jpg

Hank Delvin and Dani Kates at Delvin Farms

For four decades, the Heritage Ball has emphasized the importance of historic preservation in the community and underscored the efforts of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County.

And as the longest running black-tie event in the county, the gala boasts many longstanding traditions—one of those being the family behind the food. For nearly 40 years, a member of the Nashville-based Kates family has served guests at the annual Heritage Ball.

Charles Kates founded Kates Catering in 1970 and established a loyal contingent of clients that included the Heritage Ball and the Swan Ball, among other high-profile benefits. Daughter Dani Kates took over the business in 2002,  and says the Heritage Ball is one of the most anticipated annual events for her company.

“I’m not sure we’ve ever missed a year. It’s a tradition now,” said Dani Kates, who will be in the kitchen cooking at the Heritage Ball. “People in Franklin are really nice and laid back. My family has loved working with everyone at the Foundation. They’re just good folks.”

In July, Heritage Ball committee members gathered to taste Kates’ suggested menu for the evening of Saturday, Sept. 21.

The chef will showcase the agricultural bounty of Middle Tennessee through a farm-to-fork menu that incorporates products from the likes of Noble Springs Dairy and Bloomsbury Farm, among others. Hank Delvin of Delvin Farms in College Grove, Tenn. helped coordinate the various farmers who will contribute to the Ball meals, as well as helped plan parts of the menu.

“The great thing about the menu this year is that every facet of each dish is coming from a local farmer,” she said. “We’ve haven’t been able to locally source the meat until Bear Creek Farms came along. It’s wonderful because sourcing everything locally really ties in with the Heritage Foundation’s mission.”

Guests can expect a variety of hors d’oeuvres to start the evening. Options will include smoked gouda pimento cheese corncake with tomato chutney, tomato basil bites from Allenbrooke Farms, and a Delvin Farms fried okra cake with spicy remoulade.

Course offerings will include a roasted baby beets salad, dry-aged angus filet from Bear Creek Farms in Leiper’s Fork, and a sorghum cake with Hatcher Dairy Farms cinnamon crème fraiche.

Ball guests have also come to expect to see the face of Don Flowers, owner of the Black Flower company and another staple at the Ball. Since 2008, the business has provided an army of white-gloved waiters and bartenders who ensure the behind-the-scenes operations flow smoothly at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park.

Flowers says he was told to expect more than 700 people at the 2013 Ball. It will mark the sixth year for Black Flower’s Ball participation, and he says he understands the effect a wait staff can have on the party.

 

“I’ve been doing this for more than 20 years, and I know that the only way you can work is as a family. My staff has experience, but I look for a good work ethic and honesty before I look at that,” Flowers said. “A night can hinge on the serving staff. I can’t imagine something more important.”

For more information on the Ball, visit www.historicfranklin.com or call Torrey Barnhill at 615-591-8500, ext. 20.

All proceeds from the Heritage Ball benefit the work of the Heritage Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

PRESERVATION PUNCH COCKTAIL DESIGNED FOR 40TH HERITAGE BALL

Heritage Ball Cocktail PicCorsair Artisan, the award-winning distillery located in Nashville’s Marathon Motorworks Village, boasts a ca. 1920s classic pot still. The Prohibition-era whiskey cooker and its product are now central to the featured libation created just for the 40th Annual Heritage Ball, to be held Saturday, Sept. 21 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin.

The Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County turned to GRAYS on Main Beverage Directors Jon and Lindsay Yeager to produce a signature cocktail, made specially to celebrate four decades of preservation at the milestone gala.

The Yeagers, founders of the craft cocktail consulting company PourTaste, created a drink that honors the Foundation’s forward-looking vision while remaining grounded in tradition.

“We wanted to do something that honored history but also had a creative flavor profile,” Mr. Yeager said. “By the method in which the ingredients were combined, we were able to introduce new and different flavors in an old-fashioned way.”

“The result is Preservation Punch, the perfect way to celebrate 40 years of historical preservation, while toasting to 40 more!”

The whiskey punch is a clever concoction of orange, fig and apple, incorporating locally sourced ingredients and old-fashioned techniques. Yeager says the drink will be light and refreshing, with a hint of fall-appropriate spice that complements the season.

“All the way back to Colonial times, recipes have leaned heavily on spices and flavors such as fig,” he said. “We are honoring our heritage by staying true to these traditional ingredients and recipes.”

The Preservation Punch’s base is apple-infused Corsair Quinoa Whiskey. Other ingredients include Bulleit Bourbon, CioCiaro Amaro, lemon juice, Angostura bitters, orange bitters and housemade orange-fig shrub—a reduction of orange juice, orange zest, fig, apple cider vinegar and sugar.

“The process of making shrubs can be traced back to the founding fathers, who used them to enhance certain distilled spirits or to salvage what had been tainted by the salt of their Atlantic voyage,” he said. “The history of alcohol as a social lubricant is endlessly fascinating.”

Ball Chairs Jan and Andy Marshall say the Preservation Punch is just another demonstration of the Foundation’s focus on preserving the things that matter.

“We want the Ball to reflect our mission in every way possible,” Mr. Marshall said. “Jon took everything we are about, from local ingredients to historical influence, and tied it into this cocktail.”

All proceeds from the 40th Annual Heritage Ball benefit the works of the Heritage Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect and preserve the architectural, geographical and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County, and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

For more information or to purchase tickets to the Ball, call Torrey Barnhill at (615) 591-8500.

SPONSORS’ PARTY HONORS THOSE WHO MAKE HERITAGE BALL POSSIBLE

Sponsor's Party - 40th Annual Heritage BallPatrons of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County gathered on Aug. 19 to honor the sponsors who will make the 40th Annual Heritage Ball possible. The Ball will be held on Saturday, September 21 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin.

In its 40th year, the gala is Williamson County’s longest-running black tie event. The Sponsors’ Party, held at the incredible home of Cordia and Tom Harrington in Lynwood Downs, recognized the major investments of local and national companies that will further spur historic preservation efforts.

FirstBank, one of Tennessee’s largest community banks and a relatively new fixture on the Williamson County scene, is the presenting sponsor for this year’s milestone event.

Patron’s sponsors CapWealth Advisors and Lexus of Nashville are also important contributors to the 2013 gala.

“Similar to FirstBank’s philosophy, community is the cornerstone of the Foundation’s operations and has been since the beginning,” said Torrey Barnhill, Heritage Foundation events manager. “That’s why FirstBank—as well as our other sponsors—are such a great fit for the 40th Annual Heritage Ball. These partnerships really help emphasize the importance of local support, and the way we work as a community to save the places that matter.”

Heritage Ball Chairs Jan and Andy Marshall, the pair who owns and operates the popular Puckett’s family of restaurants, arrived in style to the event. Long-time Williamson County resident and Foundation support Tom Stillwell provided a Graham Paige Model 615 vintage vehicle to transport the Marshalls to the Harrington’s home.

As the 100-plus attendees arrived, they were treated to bites by Sargent’s Catering, spirits from Lipman Bros. and live tunes complements of the San Rafael Trio. The hand of Jeff Yates crafted the towering flower arrangements in the Harrington’s sweeping backyard, and Southern Events donated party equipment.

In addition to Presenting Sponsor FirstBank, others include the Patron’s Sponsors: CapWealth Advisors and Lexus of Nashville; the Premiere Sponsors: Williamson Medical Center and Vanderbilt University Medical Center; and the Major Sponsors: Alexander Automotive, First Farmers, First Tennessee Bank, Franklin Synergy Bank, Gordon Food Services, Grand Avenue, Lipman Bros., Martin Foundation, Puckett’s Gro. & Restaurant, Southern Events; as well as the Supporting Sponsors: Delvin Farms & Franklin Farmer’s Market, Full Service Insurance, SOCIAL/RAZOR magazine, Stites & Harbison, Westhaven, Williamson Herald/Southern Exposure, and YOUR Williamson magazine.

For more information on the Ball, or to reserve a ticket to the event, visit www.historicfranklin.com or call Torrey Barnhill at 615-591-8500, ext. 20.

All proceeds from the Heritage Ball benefit the work of the Heritage Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.

DESIGN CHAIR ANGELA CALHOUN UNVEILS GLIMPSES OF 40TH ANNUAL LOOK 

40thAnniversary LogoSponsors, committee members and supporters of the Heritage Ball gathered at Gallery 202 in downtown Franklin on June 25 to get a sneak peak of what the upcoming Ball could look like.

Now in its 40th year, the Heritage Ball is the longest-running black tie event in Williamson County. Design Chair Angela Calhoun says she has some surprises in store for the Ruby anniversary, but talked the crowd through her inspirations and some sample table settings.

“I’m of course taking heavy cues from the traditional red of the 40th anniversary,” Calhoun said. “It’s going to be a very rich design scheme, with fabrics and flowers that are sort of over the top in terms of their luxurious feel.”

Calhoun showcased a flocked ruby damask tablecloth accented by champagne linens and china. Flower arrangements included red roses, of course, with pink lilies and hydrangeas and towering red birds of paradise.

Ball Chairs Jan and Andy Marshall welcomed the crowd and shared their excitement for the process. The Marshalls reported that fundraising and solicitations for high-end auction items are going very well.

“It’s been such a joy to work with FirstBank as our presenting sponsor and so many more who have stepped up to support the important work of the Heritage Foundation with this anniversary event,” Jan Marshall said. “We’ve been reviewing all that’s happened in historic preservation over the last 40 years in Franklin, and it underscores the critical role the Foundation plays in saving the places that matter. We’re looking forward to celebrating those wins, with an eye toward the future.”

All proceeds from the Heritage Ball support the non-profit Heritage Foundation’s mission: to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.  To learn more, visit www.historicfranklin.com.

For more information on the 40th Annual Heritage Ball, please contact Torrey Barnhill at 615-591-8500 x20, or by email at tbarnhill@historicfranklin.com.

HERITAGE BALL TO CELEBRATE 40 YEARS OF PRESERVATION SUCCESS
Andy and Jan Marshall to Chair 40th Annual Event; FirstBank is Presenting Sponsor

40thAnniversary LogoFrom Roper’s Knob to the Franklin Theatre, and a long list of historic treasures saved in between, the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County has a lot to celebrate. The 40th Annual Heritage Ball, to be held Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin, will be a retrospective on all that has been accomplished over the course of nearly a half century.

The Foundation’s work could not be done without its members and supporters, including corporate sponsors who underwrite significant expenses for key fundraising events. FirstBank has agreed to serve again as presenting sponsor for the Heritage Ball, underscoring their commitment to the community and the Heritage Foundation’s mission.

“FirstBank is making a big investment in downtown Franklin because we believe in the value of our history, and the Heritage Foundation has been the driving force behind preserving and enhancing our historic treasures,” said Gordon Inman, FirstBank’s Chairman – Middle Tennessee. “We’re excited about the restoration of the Historic Five Points Post Office, and about working with the Heritage Foundation on other projects moving forward. The Ball is a wonderful way to celebrate 40 years of success and to raise funds toward the future, and we are delighted to be a part of it.”

Jan and Andy Marshall, long-time Williamson County residents who own and operate the very popular Puckett’s family of restaurants, have been named the 2013 Ball chairs.

Andy followed his father’s footsteps into the grocery store business, purchasing his first Piggly Wiggly store at the age of 26, and eventually owned several stores in the area. He was president of the Tennessee Grocers Association, but his love of food, music and community began to steer him in a different direction in the mid-‘90s.  In 1998, he opened Puckett’s Gro. & Restaurant in Leiper’s Fork, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Today, the Marshalls own Puckett’s restaurants in downtown Franklin, downtown Nashville and downtown Columbia. Puckett’s Boat House in downtown Franklin opened last year, and the Marshalls are part owners in Gray’s on Main, set to open this spring on historic Franklin’s Main Street. The restaurants have won multiple awards for best barbecue, meat and three, service, music and more.

Through the first decade of Puckett’s growth, Jan served as the company’s marketing and public relations arm. Previously, she was a director of admissions at Franklin Road Academy. She continues to play a central role in the development of the Puckett’s family of restaurants. The Marshalls have been married for 26 years, and have three adult children, Claire, Emily and Cliff. They recently welcomed their first grandchild and are expecting their second.

“We’ve always been proud to be associated with the Heritage Foundation, and it is a true honor to be asked to serve as chairs of the Heritage Ball,” Jan Marshall said. “We’re looking forward to working with the team to make the 40th Anniversary event one that will be remembered another half century from now.”

Angela Calhoun is returning as design chair, having produced a number of spectacular Balls over the last several years. She says the theme will reflect the landmark anniversary, with the color scheme associated with the traditional red that accompanies a 40-year commemoration.

“We are planning some special surprises throughout the evening that I think will make this one of the most memorable events ever,” Calhoun said.  “Every year, we try to build upon and top what has been done before, so our goal is to deliver an amazing experience that will dazzle all of the senses!”

All proceeds from the Heritage Ball benefit the work of the 46-year-old Heritage Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to protect and preserve the architectural, geographic and cultural heritage of Franklin and Williamson County and to promote the ongoing economic revitalization of downtown Franklin in the context of historic preservation.  For more information on the Ball or to request an invitation, call Torrey Barnhill at (615) 591-8500, Ext. 20.  To learn more about the Heritage Foundation, visit www.historicfranklin.com.

 

FIRSTBANK NAMED PRESENTING SPONSOR OF 2013 ANNUAL HERITAGE BALL
Community Bank Investing in Williamson County Preservation

One of Tennessee’s largest community banks – and one of Williamson County’s newest – has made a major investment in local historic preservation efforts. FirstBank will be the presenting sponsor for the 40th Annual Heritage Ball, to be held on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013 at the Eastern Flank Battlefield Park in Franklin. In its 40th year, the Heritage Ball is Williamson County’s longest-running black tie event, and one of the most anticipated each fall.

FirstBank is the third largest Tennessee-based bank, with 44 locations in Tennessee. Headquartered in Lexington, Tenn., FirstBank serves every major metropolitan market as well  many communities in between and, with more than $2 billion in total assets, has the resources to provide a comprehensive variety of financial services and products, following a community-banking model which began when the charter was issued in 1906 as Farmers State Bank, in Scotts Hill, Tenn.

Community banking is the cornerstone of FirstBank’s operations and has been its philosophy since the bank was founded. FirstBank strives to improve the quality of life for those who live in the communities it serves, with an emphasis on education through involvement in local schools and The Ayers Foundation Scholars Program, established by FirstBank chairman and sole shareholder Jim Ayers.

“We are proud to be the presenting sponsor for The Heritage Ball,” said Gordon Inman, FirstBank’s Middle Tennessee Chairman. “The Heritage Foundation’s commitment to protecting and preserving historic resources in Franklin and Williamson County is aligned with FirstBank’s community-based banking philosophy of participating and investing in all that our local communities have to offer.”

Founded in 1967, the Heritage Foundation of Franklin and Williamson County is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization dedicated to protecting and preserving historic resources in Franklin and Williamson County, Tennessee. For more information or to receive an invitation for the 40th Annual Heritage Ball, contact Torrey Barnhill at tbarnhill@historicfranklin.com or call (615) 591-8500, Ext. 20. To learn more about the Heritage Foundation, visit www.historicfranklin.com.

Click here to see the full list of sponsors who made possible the 39th Annual Heritage Ball in 2012.